Slow Food Nova Scotia

Slow Food - Nova Scotia

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Tartiflette Recipe: a Classic Take on Cheesy Potatoes

Tartiflette is a French dish originating from the Savoie and Haute Savoie region of France. The name derives from the Savoyard word for potatoes, tartifles, a term also used in Provençal. The Savoyards first heard of tartiflette when it began to appear on the menus of restaurants in the ski stations, but some have even suggested that cheese makers created the recipe to sell more of their product. Whatever the case, a tartiflette’s success is heavily dependent on the quality of cheese used.

new-potatoes

Serves 8

3 lbs new boiling potatoes, skin on

1 large onion, peeled & sliced

8 oz. thick bacon lardons (Oultons’s)

1 ½ cups white wine (L’Acadie Blanc)

¾ cup crème fraiche (stir together ½ sour cream and ½ heavy whipping cream, cover and let sit overnight a room temp)

2 rounds COLD ChampFleury Quebec cheese (cut in half and then slice horizontally to get 8 half moons of cheese)

3 tbsp Butter

1 peeled crushed garlic clove

Boil potatoes in salted water until slightly undercooked. Cool, peel and slice into ¼ inch thick slices and reserve. Sauté  bacon until brown; pour off fat leaving 3 TBSP; add onions  and cook slowly for about 10 minutes. Add wine, bring to a boil and srape up any brown bits; reduce to 1 cup liquid and reserve mixture.

Butter a large casserole (cast iron),  rub with a crushed garlic clove and put in a layer of potatoes. Spoon ½ of the bacon mixture and ½ of the crème fraiche over the top and repeat with the remaining potatoes, bacon and crème. Place cheese slices over the top RIND SIDE UP and bake uncovered in a 400F oven for about 40 minutes until brown and bubbling.

Serve with a green salad.

Submitted by: Peter Jackson